Carcass Treatment System Principles:

Achieve Destruction & Sterilization:
Utilize temperature, pressure, and agitation to breakdown material, while ensuring that sterilization is achieved throughout the entirety of the material.

Operate Efficiently in a Closed System:
Contain all material within the contents of the processing vessel – no circulation outside. Efficiently utilize resources, including natural gas, water, and electricity.

Limit Material Handling Post-Treatment:
Once material is processed and treated, the material handling should be minimal or non-existent, and should not require additional processing or treatment elsewhere.

Ease of Validation:
Validation of the system should be able to be done through proven methods, such as the placement of bio-indicators within the material prior to treatment.

 


Definitions and Comparison: The Scorecard

Composting: making a heap of wet organic matter and waiting for the materials to break down over time.  The process is aided by shredding, and ensuring proper aeration by regularly turning the mixture. Worms and fungi break up the material.

  • Composting is not a viable option for pathogenic waste.
  • no sterilization
  • can’t treat prions
  • liability
  • large footprint

 
Renderers: an apparatus which is used to process animal tissue into more useful materials, typically for purified fats like lard or grease.  The rendering process simultaneously dries the material and separates the fat from the bone and protein.  Byproducts are then collected and incinerated.
  • low operating cost
  • low level sterilization
  • can’t treat prions
  • equip. purchase
  • high odor
  • large footprint

Incineration: a gas-powered furnace, typically used and designed for industrial waste, which burns at very high temperature, reducing its contents to ash.  Ash is then collected and disposed of as municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • high equip. cost
  • difficult regulations
  • public protest
  • costly utility use
  • no agitation
  • carbon emissions



Alkaline Hydrolysis (Gen 2):
tissue is placed in a vessel that is then filled with a mixture of water and lye, and heated to a temperature around 150 °C (302 °F), at a high pressure. Tissue is broken down, and bones are collected while liquid is disposed of as sanitary municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • low equip. cost
  • equip. purchase
  • bone collection
  • chemical costs 


Thermal & Physical Degradation (Gen 3):
a revolutionary advancement in tissue disposal and sterilization, using agitation and heat to break down tissue (with or without alkali), minimizing water and caustic use in the process.  Tissue and bones are broken down and disposed of as liquid through sanitary sewer or collected as dry discharge for municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • low operating cost
  • flexible discharge
  • agitation
  • easy validation
  • no bone collection
  •  equip. purchase


Definitions and Comparison: The Scorecard

(Chart Viewed Best in Landscape or Desktop)

 Composting: making a heap of wet organic matter and waiting for the materials to break down over time.  The process is aided by shredding, and ensuring proper aeration by regularly turning the mixture. Worms and fungi break up the material.

  • Composting is not a viable option for pathogenic waste.
  • no sterilization
  • can’t treat prions
  • liability
  • large footprint

 
 Renderers: an apparatus which is used to process animal tissue into more useful materials, typically for purified fats like lard or grease.  The rendering process simultaneously dries the material and separates the fat from the bone and protein.  Byproducts are then collected and incinerated.
  • low operating cost
  • low level sterilization
  • can’t treat prions
  • equip. purchase
  • high odor
  • large footprint

 Incineration: a gas-powered furnace, typically used and designed for industrial waste, which burns at very high temperature, reducing its contents to ash.  Ash is then collected and disposed of as municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • high equip. cost
  • difficult regulations
  • public protest
  • costly utility use
  • no agitation
  • carbon emissions



Alkaline Hydrolysis (Gen 2):
tissue is placed in a vessel that is then filled with a mixture of water and lye, and heated to a temperature around 150 °C (302 °F), at a high pressure. Tissue is broken down, and bones are collected while liquid is disposed of as sanitary municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • low equip. cost
  • equip. purchase
  • bone collection
  • chemical costs 

 

Thermal & Physical Degradation (Gen 3):
a revolutionary advancement in tissue disposal and sterilization, using agitation and heat to break down tissue (with or without alkali), minimizing water and caustic use in the process.  Tissue and bones are broken down and disposed of as liquid through sanitary sewer or collected as dry discharge for municipal waste.
  • can treat prions
  • sterilizes material
  • small footprint
  • low operating cost
  • flexible discharge
  • agitation
  • easy validation
  • no bone collection
  •  equip. purchase